Tinnitus help in Hamilton

Tinnitus – Ringing in the Ear – Helped with Chiropractic

The case described in the research article linked below goes through the story of a 42 year old chiropractic patient whose tinnitus was improved after focusing the chiropractic care on the neck and jaw.  This is actually not uncommon. I see this often in my Chiropractic practice in Hamilton.  Often times these patients present with headaches or neck pains along with a buzzing or humming in their ear or ears.

Improving Tinnitus with Mechanical Treatment of the Cervical Spine and Jaw
Excerpts from the article are quoted below.

“This article describes a case report of a 42-year-old male auto mechanic experiencing intermittent bilateral tinnitus, headaches, blurred vision, and neck tightness. He described his tinnitus as a “buzzing”. He also suffered from neck pain, headaches, dizziness, and blurred vision. His occupation as a mechanic required maintenance of prolonged positions of head protrusion and neck flexion while working.”

What is tinnitus?

This is usually described by patients as a buzzing in the ear, but each patient’s experience with the sound they hear is different.  I have even heard patients say that their ear is humming.

“Subjective tinnitus is described as the perception of sound in the absence of an external sound source.”

How can the neck and jaw create tinnitus?

“Musculature and joint pathologies of the head and neck are frequently associated with tinnitus.”

“This case reflected treatment targeted at cervical (neck) and TMJ impairments and notable improvements to tinnitus.”

The neck and jaw can create tinnitus because of the closeness of the structures as well as the neurology involved.  If you touch immediately below your ear, you are actually contacting the first bone in your neck! And if you move slightly forward from this point, you are touching to back of your jaw bone!  What I often say to patients is that your brain confuses the signals of pain from your upper neck and/or your jaw for sound due to the closeness of the structures.  That is how there is a “buzzing” in the ear even without any actual sound in the environment.

Can I be losing my hearing?

It is possible that you have damaged the cells in your ear responsible for hearing.  Hopefully this is not the case, but testing this is important at a hearing assessment location.  While you test your hearing, do not forget to also get a Chiropractic examination to determine if your jaw and neck are part of the problem.  The earlier you address the underlying issues to your tinnitus, the easier it is for your body to adapt to the problem and heal.

If you are curious to learn if your case is a Chiropractic case, schedule an exam with a Chiropractor now.  The testing that we do as a Chiropractor allows us to identify misalignments in the spine and jaw that can be impacting your body’s ability to function and heal properly.

If you want to learn more, read the blog I wrote about upper neck injuries or the one on Meniere’s disease.

Living to 90+ Review and Excerpts

Living to 90+
Review of Doc Giff’s Book “90+ How I Got There”

A Chiropractic patient of mine in Hamilton will often bring me newspaper clippings of stories that she thinks I will enjoy.  The ones that I have enjoyed the most and look forward to are written by Doctor Gifford-Jones.  When my patient came in one day with his new book, I immediately ordered one for myself.  I am happy to share my favourite parts from the book below and encourage you learn from this common sense Doctor as you live towards 90 and beyond.

Here to help you live a longer, more comfortable, and active life
– Dr. Callum Peever

90+ How I Got There
By Dr. W. Gifford-Jones, M.D.

“Doc Giff” focuses his best health advice from his life as a medical doctor and medical journalist. Making it to 90+ is no easy feat. Doc Giff is fortunate to share with us how he got there. I appreciate his writing and advice as it aligns with the common sense approach of chiropractic. This insight into the world of medicine, his ability to get to the point and his humor make his articles very worthwhile. I would encourage everyone that wants to live a longer more comfortable and active life to learn from the advice of Doc Giff.

In this book he covers: The pitfalls of lifestyle, cardiovascular disease, obesity, surgery, depression, sexual behavior, radiation, exercise, infection and government bureaucracy.

Some of my favourite excerpts from the book are:

 

Lifestyle

“What will it profit a man or woman if he or she works diligently to achieve financial success and then dies prematurely of a needless disease?”

“By being prudent about lifestyle choices.”

“It’s been said it’s better to be lucky than good. I was lucky to inherit the longevity gene. This is the best start any parent can give. And I was lucky to have parents who taught me not to spend it foolishly by following a risky lifestyle. “

“I’ve been lucky to inherit the gene of “thinness” which decreases the risk of obesity and its related problems, such as Type 2 diabetes. But I also step on the scale every day. My diet isn’t perfect but it avoids excessive fats, sugar, processed flour, and it concentrates on fruits, some vegetables and fibre. I’ve been lucky to have the privilege of not being forced to retire.”

“Early in my medical career I realized that Pogo was right when he said, “We have identified the enemy and the enemy is us” so I haven’t succumbed to the North American habit of popping a pill for every ache and pain, thus causing liver and kidney damage.”  … “Rather, I’ve followed Sir William Osler’s wise advice for treating a cold. You put your hat on the bedpost, go to bed, start sipping whiskey, and when you see two hats you stop. It was Osler’s way of telling people they were over-medicating themselves with pills.”

“I have limited my radiation exposure to CT scans, chest and dental X-rays, unless absolutely needed. Nor do I believe in the current fad of cholesterol-lowering drugs.”

“Modern conveniences have dramatically decreased the amount of time that we move… Earlier death is the payment.”

More sitting time increased the risk of death.”

“Everyone should get moving.”

“Moderation in all things.”

“You have to do more than just see our dentist for regular checkups or brush your teeth. Be sure to get regular dental checkups, keep a toothbrush at the office and stimudents in your pocket.”

“You should stop smoking.”

“High doses of vitamin C and lysine could, not only prevent, but reverse atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries).”

“Pauling took 20,000 milligrams (mg) of vitamin C daily along with 5,000 mg of lysine. Medi-C Plus.”

“The deadly trio of obesity, diabetes and heart attack will eventually bring our health care system to its knees.”

“Gifford-Jones law states that one disease often leads to another.”

“Why I have been able to reach 90+ without EP=a2 killing me? There’s no doubt heredity played a role. But I’ve also stepped on the scale every day to make sure I’m not becoming obese. That’s helped me circumvent Type 2 diabetes and the big killer atherosclerosis. And for 16 years a day never goes by without me taking high doses of vitamin C and lysine.”

“What causes Alzheimer’s disease and how to treat this crippling disorder is still unknown. But I’d agree with Osler that open, flexible arteries are the prerequisite to good health. And vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant, is known to rid the body of free radicals, end products of metabolism.”

“Surely it’s reasonable to ask cardiologists to take a look at the facts and ask, “is it possible we may be mistaken about the benefits of cholesterol lowering drugs?””

“The maintenance of normal weight is a major step in avoiding the “deadly trio” of obesity, Type 2 diabetes and heart attack.”

““If you had to pick the most important food, what would you choose?” I replied, “fibre”.”

“Abraham Lincoln’s advice that we have 2 good doctors in our own body, our left and right leg.”

“The Earl of Derby who counselled, “if you can’t find time for wellness, you will have to eventually find time for sickness.””

Surgery and surviving the hospital

““Do you believe he or she is well enough to undergo an operation?””  “I’ve seen tough elderly patients who do better post-operatively than younger ones. These elderly have that look in their eye that tells you they still enjoy life, get out of bed with a purpose, see the glass still half full, are willing to take small risk to improve their quality of life, and are still trying to keep their body in shape.”

“So keeping mind and body in good shape certainly improves survival after surgery.”

““There is no such thing as a minor surgery. But there are a lot of minor surgeons.””

“The moral of the story is never, never assume that minor surgery means zero complications. You won’t fall into this trap if you ask the surgeon how long you will be in the hospital and what risks are involved. It’s also important to enquire what will happen if you decide not to have the operation.”

“”If it’s not broke, don’t fix it” Now we can add another equally sound surgical dictum, “If it’s only partially broke think twice before you decide to fix it.””

“The main message in getting to 90+ is to keep your mind alert to possible errors during a hospital stay.”

“So my advice is to try as much as possible to be informed about this disease before submitting to treatment.”

“Cast a weary eye at statistics…If something has to be proven by statistics, it’s usually wrong.”

“So how can caregivers cope with physical and mental stress day after day? First, it’s vital that they don’t put their own health at the bottom of the list.”

Napping is a healthy habit if your schedule permits. I don’t see why you would try to overcome what your body is telling you…If you don’t snooze, you lose…And don’t snooze longer than 20 to 25 minutes. You may enter a deep sleep after 30 minutes. As in most things moderation in napping is the key. If you can’t nap and need energy, avoid sugary treats that just provide a short temporary lift. Rather, select protein and complex carbohydrates such as cheese and whole wheat crackers. And go easy on caffeinated drinks that can result in dependency.”

“Several studies attest to the healing power of pets. The need for people to get off the couch and walk the dog helps to shed the pounds. Pets can also improve people’s social lives.”

Hands on Therapy

Massage is a great tool. It can have a major impact in treating tension, insomnia, headache, hypertension, arthritis and chronic pain and can promote healing in a variety of conditions.”

“Decreases stress hormones, enhances the production of endorphins, the body’s natural painkillers, and by improving circulation eases muscle spasm and joint stiffness. Besides all this, it makes you feel good, and how do you weigh that benefit?”

“An investment in relaxation and good health.”

“Massage is also non-invasive, without any of the side effects of drug therapy. You have a greater chance of reaching 90+ the more often you say “no thanks” to the doctor prescribing the unnecessary drug.”

Overview excerpts from Doc Giff

“For me getting to 90+ has been the result of many things. It’s been said that even the street dog has his lucky days. Good luck has kept me away from many diseases over which I have no control. But I did have control over needless radiation. I’ve avoided it whenever possible. Studies show that the greater the amount of radiation received the greater risk of developing a malignancy. An increasing number of tests require radiation.”

“I see examples of excessive exercise causing needless injury and many aggravating problems. Too much of anything can be worse than none at all. Walking, a moderate exercise, is still the best one. So who wins the race in terms of longevity and good health? I’d place my bet on someone who inherits good genes and who doesn’t ruin good joints and healthy hearts by overuse.”

“Researchers I talked to stressed that counting steps with a pedometer is a great motivator and has more psychological impact than counting miles. But although stepping it up helps to lose weight, it will never win the battle of the bulge without the help of sound nutrition. There’s never been a better time to stress the health benefits of walking.”